Full body scanners: ‘security theatre’

We’ve been campaigning against the use of full body scanners for a while now, and this article articulates many of the reasons we object to them in a clear and persuasive fashion. Admittedly, it also includes a criticism of a law requiring makers of caffeinated alcoholic beverages to...

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Libya: bombs and democracy don’t mix

Following our comment on the Libya situation a few days ago, we came across this sharp piece by Oscar Reyes. Succinctly, he argues that the pro-intervention justifications and the anti-bombing cries of hypocrisy would be better directed towards an assessment of the likely consequences. As he...

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Behind the scenes of the police ‘domestic extremism’ unit

With the huge protests of March 26th just passed, and with the prospect of many more as the coalition presses ahead with huge and unnecessary cuts to the public sector, more and more of us may need to know exactly how we can expect the police to respond to us if and when we take to the streets....

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Civilian slaughter in Afghanistan: further developments

Perhaps you read this horrifying piece detailing the extent to which human morality can become warped and twisted during times of war. It seems barely credible that representatives of a supposedly civilised nation — and one with a mandate to protect the civilian population of the country...

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After Iraq and Afghanistan, how can we trust intervention in Libya?

Let’s be honest; this is an incredibly sensitive subject. Protestors rebelling against the repressive Gaddafi regime are dying every day in Libya, and at first glance it appears that anything which might prevent bloodshed would be welcome. Bitter experience, however, suggests that there...

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New CCTV legislation will only curb public sector excesses

Ah, Freedom Bill, how we discover almost-daily fresh evidence of your ineffectiveness. This recent piece from ukauthority.com reveals that the new CCTV code will likely only have an impact on the public sector (cameras operated by local authorities and police). That in itself is welcome —...

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Afghanistan: the sickness of war

We’ve just seen this piece from the Guardian, detailing the casual murder of Afghan civilians by a group of US soldiers describing themselves as the ‘kill team’. Even though we focussed on Afghanistan quite a bit last week, this feels too important for us to allow it to pass...

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Truth: the first casualty of war

All this week, we’ve been following the publication of Toby Harnden’s Dead Men Risen: The Welsh Guards and the Real Story of Britain’s War in Afghanistan. He’s made a number of damning revelations about the MoD’s attempts to suppress and censor information relating...

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Pressure on full body scanners mounting in US

Our intrepid author actually experienced a full body scanner for the first time about ten days ago, at London Heathrow. Selection of passengers for body scanning is supposedly carried out on a random basis in the UK, although we feel bound to note that there did seem to be a certain...

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MoD demands: this one’s a doozy

We just have to share this. If you’ve been following the progress of Toby Harnden’s tales of MoD censorship, you’ll already have seen evidence of some pretty nefarious wrangling. With his most recent post, he reveals that the MoD reneged on an agreement that sections of text...

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