Libya: A Week of Indignity

Gaddafi is a war criminal. That much seems a fair assessment. In that context, the International Criminal Court warrant that authorises his arrest seems welcome. On the other hand, it’s highly debatable whether Gaddafi is alone in the commission of such atrocities. Current violence in...

read more

D is for Database: We Know Where You Live (What You Had For Dinner, Which Websites You Visit Most … )

You might be forgiven, after all the hullabaloo surrounding the cancelling of ID Cards shortly after the Coalition took power last May, for thinking that we’d entered an age of a more enlightened approach to data collection. Surveying the recent rash of revelations about the info various...

read more

Libya: which way forward?

And so the efforts to unseat Muammar Gaddafi continue. As former US ambassador to Morocco, Marc Ginsberg, writes in the Huffington Post, the current strategy — keep up a heavy barrage on Gaddafi’s fortress in Tripoli, and hope that something gives — is hardly looking like an...

read more

Afghanistan: making sense of the madness

The US and the UKĀ  have now been embroiled with the war in Afghanistan for ten years. To mark this less-than-glorious anniversary, BBC2 yesterday screened John Ware‘s film Afghanistan: War without End? Tom Sutcliffe, writing in today’s Independent, calls it “not a good choice...

read more

Public sector cuts: lost arts

It can be tough to ascertain the true impact of public sector spending cuts. Amidst the constant rhetoric assuring us of their necessity, voices that explain, in measured tones, quite how destructive our government’s approach really is, are often drowned out. Hence our interest in the...

read more

Internet privacy: who’s reading your emails?

We’ve become used to thinking of the internet as a space in which new norms of relationship — norms that make more sense than the kind of authoritarianism we’re used to from governments — apply. Norms such as reciprocity, egalitarianism, free speech, consideration (give...

read more

Full body scanners: the next generation?

Dubious though we are about full body scanners at airports, they do at least have the benefit of being optional (in the US, where you can opt instead for a pat-down that has been described as tantamount to sexual abuse) or administered randomly (in the UK, where you don’t have the option...

read more